Category Archives: Power Generation

Tina’s in EnergyTech this Month!

Tooting my own horn, but not really… I’m just in the magazine to introduce the real stars of the show, which are the ASME Combined Cycle Committee and the “Best Paper” from our sessions at the 2014 ASME Power Conference.

The paper is on combined heat and power (CHP) for offshore platforms – and it features a gas turbine combined cycle using CO2 as the working fluid in the bottoming cycle.

The paper can be read in EnergyTech’s April 2015 issue, including online here: http://www.energy-tech.com/steam/article_5fec7e48-d7de-11e4-9022-67f74d448918.html

We expect more exciting and innovative paper presentations at the ASME Power Conference again this year. We’d love for you to join us! More information on the conference is here: http://www.asmeconferences.org/powerenergy2015/index.cfm

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
Share

In air conditioning for the LM6000

I decided to clean my office over the weekend, and came across the Power Magazine from June 2013. One of the feature articles is on the ARCTIC inlet conditioning system by Energy Concepts, Kiewit Power Engineers and Nooter/Erikson.

ARCTIC stands for Absorption Refrigeration Cycle Turbine Inlet Conditioning. And that’s precisely what it does.

Designed around the LM6000 (but also available for other engines), the ARCTIC uses heat from the gas turbine exhaust to power an absorption chiller which cools a heat transfer medium for use in the gas turbine inlet. The system can use existing inlet coils, and can also run in heating mode. This is of special interest to the aeroderivative engines, due to their multiple control limits, which cause them to have an optimum compressor inlet temperature (CIT) for best output performance.

The optimum CIT for the LM6000 is between 46F and 49F (and varies between individual units to a small extent). The ARCTIC system can be setup to control the CIT to that optimum temperature, no matter the outside ambients. According to the Power Magazine article, the system can also start and stop automatically with the gas turbine.

With a drop of only 120F in exhaust temperature (for the LM6000, this is from ~840F to ~720F), there is still energy available for other uses from the exhaust gases, including hot water exports or combined cycle operation (which is more likely on frame based units).

Overall, a very intriguing design concept, and if you’re in the market for a new or upgraded inlet chilling system for your gas turbine, definitely worth looking into.

To read more about ARCTIC, view the Power Mag article here: http://www.powermag.com/improving-warm-weather-performance-of-the-lm6000/

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
Share

The Dam Site

I hope everyone had a great Independence Day Holiday last week.

Our family took an RV trip over to Port Angeles, WA where we camped next to the former Elwha Dam Site. Yes, I chose a vacation destination based on a power plant location… and my family agreed to join me!

If you’re not familiar with the Elwha restoration project, you can get more details here.

In a nutshell, two power producing dams that were built in the early 1900’s (without following required permit and treaty construction practices) are being removed because, as the BBC put it “Adding new [fish] ladders would have proved prohibitively expensive. And the dams also needed major upgrades because they no longer met modern environmental standards or produced energy at an efficient price.”

Webcams of the area are availablehere

There are also some YouTube videos available of the dam removals:
Elwha Dam Removal process (animation with notes)
Glines Canyon Removal (time-lapse)

The lower dam on the river was only a short walk from our camp site. The construction access road was open for pedestrian traffic, and allowed us to get up close and personal with the top of the valley where the dam used to be. There’s still a big berm covered in burlap waiting to grow new vegetation, which looked very industrial, but the river itself is back rolling through the bottom of the valley, cutting out its new path.

Elwha Dam 2013

During our trip we also attempted to get close to the upper dam site, the Glines Canyon Dam, but it was still undergoing deconstruction, and a wide area around the activities were closed to the public. We were able to have a picnic on the river below the Glines Canyon Dam site where the water was rushing past – looking almost like mud.

Below the Glines Canyon Dam

I posted a few more pictures of the Elwha at the T2E3 Facebook Page.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
Share

Energy Storage Options

This month’s Electric Light & Power magazine has an interesting article on Energy Storage, starting on page 58. It’s actually an interview with Edwin Feo, the managing partner of USRG Renewable Finance.

One of the points they make, is that fast energy storage can be used for frequency regulation, to reduce the amount of ramping at power plants. I would be curious if anyone has made a study or has the data to support the heat rate impact their plant is seeing due to increased frequency and speed of ramps – such as those seen to balance wind generation.

This would make a great paper for the ASME Power Conference coming up in July 2012.

If you have another idea for a paper, please let me know. I’m the Paper Coordinator for Track 24 (Simple and Combined Cycles) and am actively looking for additional papers (and/or panel ideas) for our sessions. If your idea doesn’t fit Track 24, I can help you get in touch with the right Track Chair as well.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
Share

Japan to Construct Combustion Power Plants – Power Technology

Power Technology reported today that Japan has collected enough wood waste from the rubble of the March 11, 2011 earthquake to fuel 5 new power plants.

Japan to Construct Combustion Power Plants – Power Technology.

Based on some gross assumptions, the 5 million tons of wood waste they’ve collected will fuel five 10 MW power plants for 12-15 years.

Assumptions include:  the wood waste has an average heating value of 6,800 Btu/lb (20% moisture), net plant heat rate is 14,000 Btu/kWh and plant capapcity factors will be better than 80%.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
Share

Power Workshop

I will be presenting a seminar on how to calculate key performance indicators for combined cycle power plants at this year’s ASME Power Conference. 

For more information on the conference – including how to register for the workshop, see ASME’s website.

Looking forward to seeing many of you next month!

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
Share

NFPA 56 Coming to a Site Near You

As reported by Combined Cycle Journal, presentations at this year’s spring CTOTF gathering included an outline of the new NFPA 56; regulations on safe handling of natural gas piping systems – including preparation for repairs, venting and purging.

From the article, regarding the new “Provisional Standard for the Commissioning and Maintenance of Fuel Gas Piping Systems”:

“NFPA 56 provides minimum safety requirements for the commissioning and maintenance of fuel gas piping—from the point of delivery to the equipment shutoff valve—found in power plants and industrial and commercial facilities. Activities impacted include the cleaning of new or repaired piping systems, placing piping systems into service, and removing piping from service. The term “system” applies to all system components—including valves, regulators, and other appurtenances—and any segment of the system that can be isolated from it.”

The standard, which is expected to be released later this year will require new operating procedures and inspections for most facilities.  To learn more about NFPA 56 from the CTOTF presentation, visit www.ctotf.org- there should be an item on the left-hand navigation bar for “NFPA 56″.  The link opens a PDF of the presentation made by John Puskar of CEC Combustion Services Group.  A full copy of the NFPA 56 draft is included at the end of the presentation for industry review (note, this is not the official release version – that is not expected to be available until later this year).

Natural gas is a powerful commodity.  Please be safe.

Thank you again to CCJ for another timely and important article.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
Share

7FA issue with liquid fuel lines

 Combined Cycle Journal posted an article yesterday (4/14/11) regarding a potential safety hazard on the 7FA liquid fuel lines – even when the unit is not a duel fuel unit, and fired natural gas only.

A leak around a blank flange on an unused liquid fuel port led to a pressure reduction in the combustion chamber  – which allowed the flame to move back and attach to the fuel nozzle itself.  Once the flame was attached, severe material deterioration occured.

The details, including pictures and recommendations are included in their article, here.  If you operate any 7FA’s – on any fuel – I recommend you take a look at the article’s findings.

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
Share